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Subway Tuna Contains No Tuna Whatsoever

Credit: Unsplash

Way back in January, fast food chain Subway was slapped with a lawsuit in California alleging that their tuna salad, a long-standing staple of their menu, actually contains no traces of marine life, let alone any tuna. Naturally, Subway denied the allegations, prompting various interested parties to perform detailed investigations into the matter, including lab tests of the tuna in question. The Washington Post funded a lab test at the time that came back inconclusive, but thanks to a new test funded by The New York Times, we may have a more conclusive answer.

A reporter for the Times obtained samples of Subway tuna from three different Subway locations around Los Angeles and submitted them to a commercial food tester for analysis. After the tests, a spokesperson from the lab wrote the Times with their findings.

“No amplifiable tuna DNA was present in the sample and so we obtained no amplification products from the DNA,” the spokesperson wrote. “Therefore, we cannot identify the species.”

“There’s two conclusions,” the spokesperson continued. “One, it’s so heavily processed that whatever we could pull out, we couldn’t make an identification. Or we got some and there’s just nothing there that’s tuna.”

According to Subway’s menu, their tuna is supposed to be flaked tuna in brine, mayonnaise and a flavor-preserving additive. If these results are accurate, however, then the original point of the lawsuit, which is that California residents Karen Dhanowa and Nilima Amin “were tricked into buying food items that wholly lacked the ingredients they reasonably thought they were purchasing,” may actually hold some water.

Subway has continued to deny the allegations, insisting that all of their tuna is the genuine, wild-caught article. In fairness, previous tests conducted elsewhere have claimed that the tuna is, in fact, tuna, so either some stores are selling some manner of tuna hodge-podge and others aren’t, or there’s something fishy going on here.


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Subway Tuna Contains No Tuna Whatsoever

Credit: Unsplash

Way back in January, fast food chain Subway was slapped with a lawsuit in California alleging that their tuna salad, a long-standing staple of their menu, actually contains no traces of marine life, let alone any tuna. Naturally, Subway denied the allegations, prompting various interested parties to perform detailed investigations into the matter, including lab tests of the tuna in question. The Washington Post funded a lab test at the time that came back inconclusive, but thanks to a new test funded by The New York Times, we may have a more conclusive answer.

A reporter for the Times obtained samples of Subway tuna from three different Subway locations around Los Angeles and submitted them to a commercial food tester for analysis. After the tests, a spokesperson from the lab wrote the Times with their findings.

“No amplifiable tuna DNA was present in the sample and so we obtained no amplification products from the DNA,” the spokesperson wrote. “Therefore, we cannot identify the species.”

“There’s two conclusions,” the spokesperson continued. “One, it’s so heavily processed that whatever we could pull out, we couldn’t make an identification. Or we got some and there’s just nothing there that’s tuna.”

According to Subway’s menu, their tuna is supposed to be flaked tuna in brine, mayonnaise and a flavor-preserving additive. If these results are accurate, however, then the original point of the lawsuit, which is that California residents Karen Dhanowa and Nilima Amin “were tricked into buying food items that wholly lacked the ingredients they reasonably thought they were purchasing,” may actually hold some water.

Subway has continued to deny the allegations, insisting that all of their tuna is the genuine, wild-caught article. In fairness, previous tests conducted elsewhere have claimed that the tuna is, in fact, tuna, so either some stores are selling some manner of tuna hodge-podge and others aren’t, or there’s something fishy going on here.


Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

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Way back in 2009, acclaimed filmed director James Cameron released Avatar, a CGI science-fiction epic that took the world by storm and became one...

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Last month, production ground to a halt on the film Being Mortal, directed by Aziz Ansari and starring Bill Murray and Seth Rogan. The...

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Over the weekend, veteran television personality Jon Stewart was awarded the Mark Twain Prize for his illustrious career in TV and stand-up comedy. Many...

LOL

Subway Tuna Contains No Tuna Whatsoever

Credit: Unsplash

Way back in January, fast food chain Subway was slapped with a lawsuit in California alleging that their tuna salad, a long-standing staple of their menu, actually contains no traces of marine life, let alone any tuna. Naturally, Subway denied the allegations, prompting various interested parties to perform detailed investigations into the matter, including lab tests of the tuna in question. The Washington Post funded a lab test at the time that came back inconclusive, but thanks to a new test funded by The New York Times, we may have a more conclusive answer.

A reporter for the Times obtained samples of Subway tuna from three different Subway locations around Los Angeles and submitted them to a commercial food tester for analysis. After the tests, a spokesperson from the lab wrote the Times with their findings.

“No amplifiable tuna DNA was present in the sample and so we obtained no amplification products from the DNA,” the spokesperson wrote. “Therefore, we cannot identify the species.”

“There’s two conclusions,” the spokesperson continued. “One, it’s so heavily processed that whatever we could pull out, we couldn’t make an identification. Or we got some and there’s just nothing there that’s tuna.”

According to Subway’s menu, their tuna is supposed to be flaked tuna in brine, mayonnaise and a flavor-preserving additive. If these results are accurate, however, then the original point of the lawsuit, which is that California residents Karen Dhanowa and Nilima Amin “were tricked into buying food items that wholly lacked the ingredients they reasonably thought they were purchasing,” may actually hold some water.

Subway has continued to deny the allegations, insisting that all of their tuna is the genuine, wild-caught article. In fairness, previous tests conducted elsewhere have claimed that the tuna is, in fact, tuna, so either some stores are selling some manner of tuna hodge-podge and others aren’t, or there’s something fishy going on here.


Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

Entertainment

Way back in 2009, acclaimed filmed director James Cameron released Avatar, a CGI science-fiction epic that took the world by storm and became one...

Entertainment

While veteran actor Adam Sandler is best known for his comedic work, in recent years, he’s shown that he has surprising range when it...

Entertainment

Last month, production ground to a halt on the film Being Mortal, directed by Aziz Ansari and starring Bill Murray and Seth Rogan. The...

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Over the weekend, veteran television personality Jon Stewart was awarded the Mark Twain Prize for his illustrious career in TV and stand-up comedy. Many...